Posted in education

Building School 2.0

I recently read the book, Building School 2.0.  The book is written with 95 essays on changes that should be made in education to help us meet the needs of every child.

I love the essays – they get you fired up and start you thinking.   How could this look in my school?  In my district? In my classroom?

What if a campus looked at their problem of practice, and asked teachers to pick and read just one of the many essays.  After teachers choose the essay that hits home with them, they make goals on how to improve their classroom.  Just a few baby steps here and there, nothing huge or grand, but progress.

Imagine if every campus did this – a few baby steps at a time, how a school would improve for each child.  How learning would improve across the board for all children.

Here is my Goodreads review of Building School 2.0

 

Building School 2.0: How to Create the Schools We NeedBuilding School 2.0: How to Create the Schools We Need by Chris Lehmann

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This is a good book with multiple essay-style chapters that bring to light some of the changes that need to happen in education. These essays do highlight the changes that need to happen to assure that we educate all children, and not just a few.

This book really fired me up to share with others, I can see this being a great read as a faculty. I’ll write more about that on my blog – but this is a great book to start discussions amongst educators.

View all my reviews

Posted in education, innovation, technology

Empowering Students

socialjusticeBeing a student today is a much different experience than most adults experienced.  As educators, we have to realize that today’s students need an experience that empowers them.  What students don’t need is to have information shoveled into their heads, instead, they need to learn to create and optimize the tools they have to make a difference in the world.

Technology now allows all of us to be global learners and social change agents.  The walls of our classrooms are now a physical barrier that we can overcome.  As we talk about the need to help students develop core values, our students can learn about how those values make a global impact.

For example, I recently discussed with a group of teachers the impact that Skype can have in a classroom.  Skype is very simple to use but allows students to connect with others across the globe.  I’ve worked with a teacher who facilitated a discussion among students in Texas with students in Brasil.  What a powerful experience for her students.

Our community is still rebuilding after Hurricane Harvey.  I’m now part of a Facebook technologygroup created to send books to our campus, I’ve seen and taken part in Flipgrid videos that are created to uplift our students in this very difficult time.  The outpouring of love from those around the world to help our students has emphasized how technology can be used to empower others to make a positive difference in the world.

I recently had a discussion with a colleague about our views on the ever-changing role of schools in our community.  Our original university education programs didn’t prepare us for the evolution of the new school.

Like most careers, research and advancements in technology have taken us to new and exciting heights in the understanding of the child and how best to serve them in classrooms.  Using the classroom as a way to empower students to see themselves as agents of change makes the classroom relevant, years after the lesson has been taught.